Thursday, October 8, 2009

Six Ribbons (to tie back your hair)

PROLOGUE

I first heard this song in the 80s on the radio while I was a student. My radio was a trusted companion everytime I would study in my room, and I would record the songs that I like at that time. So by the time I finished my studies, I inherited about 15-20 C90 cassettes that I believe are still in good working condition, and still intact somewhere in my home.

As I have pointed before, if you aren't sure what is a cassette and what C90 denotes, you should be visiting your local museum soon!

In the late 80s in Kerteh, one day my then boss borrowed my car and upon returning the key to me, she was raving about the cassette I have in the car. The cassette was from a selection from 1981 when she was in her final year in England while thousand of miles away down south this blogger was still a matric student. Oh, so my taste in music is not too far off mainstream I guess.

I was taken by this song so much so I had bought a piano sheet (book) that contained the notes this song (you know those togeh-togeh thingy). I was hoping years down the road, I would be able to get someone to play it for me, knowing fully well these hands of mine would never be good enough to create beautiful melodies.

Yes, years down the road later, I think Arif and Akmal are proficient enough to be playing this one for me. The book is still intact even though it was from 1985. And I would never believe it myself that it could be done and I had never thought I would go through with it.

What I didn't know then was that this was a song from the TV Series Against the Wind. I only have a B&W TV, as TV was not a priority then as a student (I can't afford one, and I didn't have the time anyway except on weekends). Looks like an interesting series to me. Anyway the TV series precede my days there anyway.

SIX RIBBONS

So here it is. Do enjoy this beautiful folk song from Jon English. I wish I was the writer of the lyric [sigh]. Thank you Jon. The song peaked at #5 in Australia in 1979 and #1 in Norway.


Jon English – Six Ribbons

If I were a minstrel I’d sing you six love songs
To tell the whole world of the love that we share
If I were a merchant I’d bring you six diamonds
With six blood red roses for my love to wear

But I am a simple man, a poor common farmer
So take my six ribbons to tie back your hair

Yellow and brown, Blue as the sky

Red as my blood, Green as your eyes

If I were a nobleman I’d bring you six carriages
And six snow white horses to take you anywhere
If I were the emperor I’d build you six palaces
With six hundred servants for comforting fare

But I am a simple man, a poor common farmer
So take my six ribbons to tie back your hair

If I were a minstrel I’d sing you six love songs
To tell the whole world of the love that we share
So be not afraid love, you’re never alone love
While you wear my ribbons to tie back your hair

Once I was a simple man, a poor common farmer
I gave you six ribbons to tie back your hair

Too-ra-lee, too-ra-lie, all I can share
Is only six ribbons to tie back your hair

Too-ra-lee, too-ra-lie, all I can share
I gave you six ribbons to tie back your hair

And here is instrumental version. Equally haunting.


Guys, soon I would like you all to be playing this song please.

But I am a simple man
A poor common farmer
So take my six ribbons to tie back your hair

EPILOGUE

This is a digression, but I thought I should showcase the talent of Jon English (he is Australian). But this is rock and not folk song. Such was his diverse talent! He was also the writer of the above series and won him a Logie Award in 1978 and three times Entertainer of the Year.

But equally a great song in its own sense. The lyric is again the one holding the song together. The dramatic music blends well with the lyrics. There are stories to be told and lessons to be learned here. Especially in this new millennium. For our daughters, who may be looking for the glamour life.




Hollywood Seven
She came in one night from Omaha, worn out
'cause she never could sleep on trains,
Took the bus to Hollywood
Lookin' for a room in the pourin' rain
Hair so blonde her eyes so brown
She thought she'd take this town and turn it upside down

Me, I was livin' in a hotel just off Sunset
She moved in across the hall
She said she'd be a movie star
And waited every mornin' for the call
I asked her in for a drink but she hardly had the time
Her call might come tomorrow, she got to learn her lines


Hollywood Seven, rooms to rent, till your name goes up in lights
Hollywood Seven, you can dream your dreams for seven bucks a night
Hollywood Seven, rooms to rent, till your name goes up in lights
Hollywood Seven, you can dream your dreams for seven bucks a night

Now the months went by without a job
The money that she saved was nearly spent
So she started bringin' strangers home
Just tryin' to find a way to pay the rent
She'd sit and drink my coffee with nothin' much to say
Just busy rehearsin' in her mind the scene she'd never play

Hollywood Seven, rooms to rent, till your name goes up in lights
Hollywood Seven, you can dream your dreams for seven bucks a night

Hollywood Seven, rooms to rent, till your name goes up in lights
Hollywood Seven, you can dream your dreams for seven bucks a night

I found her there one mornin'
When she didn't come for coffee when I called
She brought the wrong one home this time
There were crazy lipstick squalls across the wall
Now she's goin' back to Omaha but not the way she planned
There will be no crowd to cheer her on, no welcome home, no band

Hollywood Seven, rooms to rent, till your name goes up in lights
Hollywood Seven, you can dream your dreams for seven bucks a night

Hollywood Seven, rooms to rent, till your name goes up in lights
Hollywood Seven, you can dream your dreams for seven bucks a night

Hollywood Seven, rooms to rent, till your name goes up in lights
Hollywood Seven, you can dream your dreams for seven bucks a night

1 comment:

  1. budakjawidinewcastleOctober 8, 2009 at 12:44 PM

    No 1 in Norway? Wonder what the Norwegians thinking at that time.
    Solksjear-the only Norwegian that matter to me

    ReplyDelete